JAPANESE CULTURE BLOG — KITCHENWARE

The Humble Tenugui (てぬぐい)

CRAFTS DIY KITCHENWARE

The Humble Tenugui (てぬぐい)

Giftwrap, bento box cover, headband, wall art, and now mask.  Don’t underestimate the humble tenugui. Staples of everyday Japanese life, tenugui are incredibly useful pieces of cotton, silk or hemp fabric that date all the way back to the Heian era (794 to 1185 AD).  Although they were originally considered luxury items, they’ve since become popular for their eco-friendly, multipurpose uses.  Its name comes from the Japanese characters for te (“hand”) and nugui (“to wipe/wiping”).  Sway Gallery Tenugui Collection Today we’re sharing a simple, step-by-step guide from our friends Hamamonyo so you too can make your own DIY tenugui face...

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Urushi no Hi (漆の日)

CRAFTS KITCHENWARE

Urushi no Hi (漆の日)

Today is Urushi no Hi (or the less fun-sounding “Lacquer Day”) in Japan. The urushi technique dates back to 5000 BC and involves a long and complicated technical process using sap extracted from Asian lacquer trees. Multiple layers of wafer-thin, semi-transparent lacquer are carefully applied by hand to create the distinctive depth and sheen, making urushi goods a thoughtful gift for gastronomes. Have you seen our lacquered chopsticks and magewappa (bent woodware) lacquer covered plates?

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